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Honeymoon

Líbánky / 2012 / IMDB

  • Director / Jan Hřebejk
  • DOP / Martin Štrba
  • Producer / Fog'n'Desire Films, Viktor Tauš, Martin Kollar
  • Executive Producer / Tomáš Rotnágl
  • Coproducer / K Film plus, Tomáš Rotnágl, Jan Kadlec. Česká televize, Praha, Sokol KOLLAR, Michal Kollár (SK)
  • Production Designer / Jan Kadlec
  • Stage Setting / Jan Koděra
  • Script&Theme / Petr Jarchovský
  • Music / Aleš Březina
  • Editor / Alois Fišárek
  • Creative producer / Tomáš Baldýnský
  • Head of Film Centre / Helena Uldrichová
  • Main Script Editor / Jaroslav Sedláček
  • Costumes / Katarína Štrbová-Bieliková
  • Make-up artist / Zdeněk Klika
  • Sound / Lukáš Moudrý
  • Distributor / FALCON

About

Honeymoon, the new film by Jan Hřebejk, based on the screenplay by Petr Jarchovský, concludes a loose trilogy of stories from contemporary life, completed by the successful films Kawasaki’s Rose and Innocence.

The common denominator of these pictures is a secret buried in the past, which years later comes back to haunt the film’s characters. Each of the films presents this clash of past and present in a distinctive style and a different genre. The echoes from the past may have a dramatic, tragic or comic effect.

“It wasn’t our original intention to make a trilogy, and these projects also came about a little at random, for example the text for Innocence was created before that of Kawasaki’s Rose,” says director Jan Hřebejk after the end of filming. “The trilogy is therefore genuinely loose, and so I don’t have the feeling that we’ve completed something. All I want is for Honeymoon to be successful and considered an interesting film.”

Honeymoon takes place over a period of two days of a wedding celebration. The bride and groom – Tereza (Aňa Gaislerová) and Radim (Stanislav Majer) – make a fetching couple, despite the fact that both have already been married previously and still bear the scars. Tereza a broken heart, Radim an adolescent son. However, they are both willing to try again, and are convinced that this time it will work out. And it seems that the wedding celebrations taking place on a sunny day, in the company of their families in the home of the bride’s parents, surrounded by romantic countryside, will truly be the most beautiful start to their life together. But… suddenly an uninvited guest appears at the wedding party. Jan Benda soon gains the favour of those present. The mothers and aunties pamper him, whilst the men generously fill him with drink. But who on earth is he? And where did he come from? Is he just a harmless stranger who makes a habit of mixing in with the crowd with the intention of getting a free meal? Or has he emerged from the past of one of the guests? And if so, of who? With Jan Benda at the wedding table, cracks begin to appear in the facade of the romance. Something must be done to get this man out as quickly as possible. Some secrets simply should not be revealed!

Honeymoon is a continuation of the well established co-operation of the author-director team of Petr Jarchovský and Jan Hřebejk, and the fourth time the director Hřebejk has worked together with leading Czech actress Aňa Geislerová.

The winner of five Czech Lion awards gained two of these prizes for her performances in the lead roles in Hřebejk’s films Beauty in Trouble (2006) and Innocence (2007).

“Our work together has brought all the advantages and disadvantages of a long-term relationship. There are things we no longer need to say to each other, we know each other well and what we can expect from each other. But I also sometimes start to get the typical partner’s feeling that he doesn’t notice me so much anymore,” says Aňa Geislerová.

In Honeymoon, Aňa Geislerová plays the role of the bride Tereza, who on her wedding day has to deal with a situation which could have an impact not only on her freshly beginning marriage, but also the whole of her future life.

Appearing in the lead roles are Kristýna Fuitová, Stanislav Majer, Jiří Černý, Jiří Šesták and David Máj.

The filming took place during the course of September 2012, predominantly in South Bohemia, in the surrounding area of the town of Třeboň, and was completed in the North Bohemian city of Liberec, where the scenes from the wedding ceremony were filmed.

“In both South Bohemia, in Třeboň, and in Liberec we found not only excellent locations, but we also encountered immense understanding and an accommodating approach on the part of the representatives of the municipal and regional bodies, which offered us a helping hand in the production organisation. It was also thanks to their help that the filming could take place smoothly and all the deadlines were met,” says co-producer Tomáš Rotnágl.

The film’s producers are Fog ‘n ‘Desire Films, K Film, Czech Television and also Samastinor. For Slovakia the film is co-produced by Sokol Kollar and Trigon Production s.r.o.

The film distributor, the Falcon company, plans the film premiere for 22 August 2013.

Honeymoon was chosen to represent the Czech Republic at the main competition of the 48th Karlovy Vary International Film Festival.

Synopsis

PREMISE:

Are we responsible for the offenses we have committed during childhood or adolescence? Is it possible at all to atone for them? Is vengeance a way out when it affects the innocent? Evil has the unusual quality of moving, of being contracted like an infectious disease that remains virulent for many years and can later break out again…

SUMMARY:

The plot of LIBANKY (The Honeymoon) takes place over three days, during Radim and Tereza‘s wedding party. Secrets from the past pry into Teresa’s life during her own wedding – and the party slowly drifts into a nightmare. Tereza has already attempted to marry once; she is naturally hesitant about her current marriage. She decided to marry Radim after cautious deliberation, having lived with him for a long time. The bridegroom is a friendly fellow who treats Tereza with understanding and care. Anyone would think they wonderfully belong together…

The past suddenly breaks into the present as an optician from a neighboring town. When Radim visits his shop by chance with Dominik, his fifteen-year-old son from a first marriage, the optician behaves in an odd way. As though he was somehow familiar with Radim. Later on, he surreptitiously mixes with the guests at the wedding ceremony. Tereza believes that he is an acquaintance of Radim – but Radim denies it. On the other hand, he omits that he has seen that man while getting his son‘s glasses repaired. Tereza‘s doubts become all the stronger as the man from the optician‘s shop mixes with the guests at the ensuing wedding party.

The uninvited guest introduces himself as Jan Benda and tries to remind Radim that they are acquainted from their secondary school days. Despite his strangely incoherent story, the family accepts him and keeps him at the party… Benda casually chats with wedding guests. Although he is making growingly disturbing allusions, people take no steps to have him expelled. Renata, Tereza‘s younger sister, senses that Benda is gay and bring it to Tereza‘s attention. Running out of patience, Tereza explicitly asks Benda to leave. Benda agrees to leave but only after Tereza opens his wedding gift. Her surprise is all the greater when she finds out the gift is a bronze urn bearing the engraving „Jan Benda“ with a date of birth and a date of death… The ensuing confrontation between Benda and Radim reveals that they are acquainted and share a tormenting past. Radim takes the gatecrasher away from the party once and for all.

After Tereza and Radim‘s wedding night, early in the morning, Benda reappears at their house. Confronted by Tereza, he recounts her in private the past events that binds him to Radim. Back in the nineties, they used to attend the same boarding school. Radim and two of his classmates used to harass other pupils, one of whom was Jan Benda himself. The unknown optician had introduced himself as Benda only to remind Radim of his past guilt. A strong friendship had emerged between Jan Benda and the would-be avenger, who had also experienced harassment. That friendship evolved into love. Benda ultimately couldn‘t go on with his unbearable sufferings and committed suicide after leaving the boarding school. After completing this act of vengeance for the death of his lover, and with Tereza now broken, “Benda” hands her a love letter in which his soul mate alluded to Radim‘s role in his state of mind. He then vanishes without revealing his identity. Tereza‘s disappointment and her disheartened attitude quickly make Radim realize that something has happened. Inevitably, Tereza accuses Radim of inhumanity; the exchange degenerates into the couple‘s first extensive quarrel… The plot culminates with the sudden disappearance of Dominik, Radim‘s son, during a tour of a neighboring town with his parents, the day after the party. Among other places, the parents also look for him at the now closed optician‘s shop; the search ends at the guest house, where everyone expects Dominik to have come back alone by foot. But he isn‘t there either… Radim, participating in the search, begins to have the horrible suspicion that “Benda‘s” revenge may not be over yet. Radim and his brother-in-law Milan break into the optician‘s shop, where they find evidence of Dominik’s presence and even catch “Benda” himself. Things come to a head, an interrogation takes place. Radim and Milan come to the very brink of murder. At the end, however, a lucky coincidence reveals that with Dominik it‘s all a little different…

EPILOGUE:

The story ends with all participants on edge. Although there was no murder, it feels as if there had been one. The evil born a long time ago was hibernating, like a seed; at a sudden and an unexpected encounter, it has sprouted forth and grew into vengeance, bearing ever-poisonous fruits. The only hope of overcoming the poison is to try to admit wrongdoing and to forgive.

 

Interviews

Jan Hřebejk – director

Honeymoon should thematically conclude the loose trilogy of Kawasaki’s Rose – Innocence – Honeymoon, which as its central theme combines the motif of a secret in the past which can have an unexpected impact upon the present. Do you regard Honeymoon as such a conclusion of this trilogy?

To be honest we never consciously planned any kind of trilogy. We rather attempt to point audiences in the direction of what they should expect… Honeymoon is a distinctive film, an intimate drama which in this case takes place over the course of a single afternoon, the wedding night and part of the next day. It was a challenge for all involved, and in addition I worked with a fundamentally altered team – cameraman Martin Štrba, architect Jan Kadlec, sound engineer Lukáš Moudrý, editor Alois Fišárek. And the producers Viktor Tauš, Mišo Kollár and Tomáš Rotnágl.

In your opinion is it necessary to reveal past secrets, and specifically in the case of Honeymoon, is a forgotten misdemeanour from youth a reason for a person to be confronted and punished for it?

That’s difficult to say – I hope so. This time the film is to a considerable extent our personal testimony. In it we ask various questions which we consider important. In its way the film is an example of how the human conscience works. I’d say that this story is emotionally riveting. Perhaps because it could happen to anyone. It actually concerns an inconspicuous, understandable, almost innocent evil…

Honeymoon is the fourth time you’ve worked with Aňa Geislerová, who is one of the core actresses of your films. What are the advantages or disadvantages of this co-operation, when you know each other so well, on both a professional and personal level?

There’s only one disadvantage: It gets harder and harder not to repeat yourself. The greatest advantage so far has been the fact that we have mutually attempted to excel ourselves. To get into Petr’s characters, to fine tune the co-ordination, take the audience’s breath away… And to do this with subtlety. I hope it works. And I also have the feeling that the others act better with Aňa. This also applies for example to Bolek Polívka. It’s not possible to say about every star that they are a collective, team player…

Was the role of Tereza written specifically for Aňa?

No. We’ve never written a specific role for anybody. With the exception of the adolescent Kšanda (Jan Semotán) in Big Beat.

One of the questions the film asks of the audience is whether, on the basis of a relationship and a given promise, a person should forgive, and what the limits of that forgiveness are. If you yourself had to define the limit beyond which it’s no longer possible to forgive, what would it be?

That depends on the specific individual and his or her inner strength. On circumstances which are different in each case. In this respect our film asks questions, never answers them.

In your films you like to introduce new or lesser known acting talents. Why did you choose Stanislav Majer and Jiří Černý?

Because it’s an immense thing to introduce to the wider public someone you admire – for example in the theatre. Over the course of several years I’ve experienced several overwhelming moments at performances of the Chamber Theatre in the Comedy Theatre, and it all culminated last year with the filming of Garbage, the City and Death… From that we moved directly with Standa and Jirka to Třeboň, where we filmed Honeymoon. The Chamber Theatre was an exceptional pool of literally phenomenal talents – not only acting (Finger, Pechlát, Štrébl, Zach, Uhlířová, Míčová, Kamila Polívková, Ivan Acher…). And a whole range of theatres and cinematography will continue to draw from this pool, that you can bet on!

Petr Jarchovský – screenwriter

Honeymoon should thematically conclude the loose trilogy of Kawasaki’s Rose – Innocence – Honeymoon, which as its central theme combines the motif of a secret in the past which can have an unexpected impact upon the present. Do you regard Honeymoon as such a conclusion of this trilogy?

 I can’t guarantee that I won’t write another story in future in which the past comes back to haunt the present of the characters and impact upon their lives. The personal history of the characters provides fertile soil for drama. From the beginning we never conceived the films Kawasaki’s Rose, Innocence and Honeymoon as a trilogy. In the end we were captivated by a thematic connection: if we don’t acknowledge our past and admit our own guilt first of all to ourselves, and then to those around us, we’ll never gain absolution and forgiveness.

In your opinion is it necessary to reveal past secrets, and specifically in the case of Honeymoon, is a forgotten misdemeanour from youth a reason for a person to be confronted and punished for it?

As can be seen from the story: if there are victims who have suffered because of our offence, then yes. It’s not about punishment, but acceptance of responsibility. Our stories don’t bring unequivocal judgements. It seems far more beneficial to me to ask questions. The audience can go through their own thought process which our characters are experiencing “on the big screen”. If this happens, then our endeavour hasn’t been in vain.

Jan Hřebejk says that the role of Tereza wasn’t written directly for Aňa Geislerová, nevertheless she has merged perfectly with the character. Do you really have no actors in mind when you’re writing a story, in particularly when it concerns someone like Aňa, who you’ve worked with for many years?

For us Aňa is an exceptional co-creator of female characters. She forms them in the phase of the individual versions of the screenplay, she seeks herself in them, she searches for the key to their motivations, she wants to know and understand them and work out her approach to them. She is without doubt one of the most remarkable actresses, who is able to play the roles of diverse characters, such as in my case Hana in Želary, Marcela in Beauty in Trouble, the mother in National Identity Card, Anna in Teddy Bear or Lída in Innocence. Each character is entirely different in all respects and highly convincing. I regard our meeting, which began when Aňa was only thirteen in our joint artistic debut Let’s Sing the Song Naked-on, to be a huge stroke of luck. As regards the phantom actors I imagine when I’m writing a script, they’re mostly immortal giants or unattainable stars such as Nataša Gollová or Dana Medřická, or perhaps Cate Blanchett, Emma Thompson or Kate Winslet …

The story’s main heroine finds herself in a situation in which, on the basis of her promise, is to remain with her husband “for better or for worse”, and therefore also to forgive. Do you believe in forgiveness, and if you yourself had to define the limit beyond which it’s no longer possible to forgive, what would it be?

 I believe in forgiveness. We examine the limit beyond which it’s no longer possible to forgive in our films, and we ask ourselves the question that all of us have to try and answer. It’s important for each of us to do this alone in order to conduct an inner debate with our own conscience.

Whilst in Kawasaki’s Rose for example evil was the personification of a certain social phenomenon, in Honeymoon it concerns rather a “small human” evil, which however is probably no less dangerous. Isn’t it however just a question of possibilities? That the person who has this within himself or herself, manifests evil depending only on the circumstances to which degree?

I wouldn’t dare to divide people into the “bearers of evil” and the “good ones”. (Such clearly defined storylines are the business of fairytales or genre films). In real life, all of us have both sides in ourselves. We are interested in the causes that form us, and the situations which make a certain aspect to come to the surface within a character. This selfsame situation of danger may have entirely opposite effects on two different characters: for example in our film Divided We Fall, the deadly threat in the era of the Nazi occupation generates entirely different reactions and attitudes on the part of the characters. The main hero behaves courageously, whereas the neighbour is perfidious. We’re therefore interested by the given factors, the internal mechanisms of the characters, which predetermine the development and transformation of each character. And through their development we attempt to ask questions to ourselves.

In a dramatic scene with Tereza, Radim defends himself with the assertion that his present self has nothing in common with his past self. Do you believe that people can genuinely change, or is this merely an excuse before their own conscience?

That is the fundamental question which our drama asks: are there limits to how responsible we are for our actions? For this reason we place the moment of Radim’s offence at the threshold of adulthood. The answer to this question must be polemical. Unequivocal judgements have always provoked us, forced us to examine the character from all sides and points of view. We’ve never been interested in apportioning blame, but in getting a true picture of the issue which the genre of psychological drama provides.

Aňa Geislerová – actress

Honeymoon is a film full of questions of which the most important is this: In your view is it necessary to reveal past secrets, and specifically in the case of Honeymoon, is a forgotten misdemeanour from youth a reason for a person to be confronted and punished for it? What would be your answer?

That’s difficult. There are things that people aren’t proud of on emerging from their “adolescence”, and I think all of us have something like that. But they’re generally harmless, awkward or embarrassing things. What happens in the film is not just some childish prank or banter. It’s a dark, malignant offence, committed by people who must have suspected its consequences. This can’t just simply be erased. I’ve taken plenty of knocks in my life, and a few of them have been unnecessarily cruel and confrontational, but I’ve also learnt a few lessons, so it’s all ended up smelling of roses. And I also now know that everything will eventually be revealed anyway. I think it’s important how a person adopts an approach with hindsight. If they understand that they’ve done something wrong, they can apologise, be forgiven, and it can be forgotten. Or they can deny the past, and that’s never a good thing. Wounds need to be cleansed in order to heal.

Jan Hřebejk says that the role of Tereza wasn’t written directly for you, nevertheless this character will undoubtedly be another important moment in your career. How did you feel in this role, and what about her did you most identify with?

I’ll start with what I was absolutely taken with. That’s the fact that for most of the film I’ll be made up, perfectly groomed and well dressed. I’ve been in so many roles without make-up. When we formed the character, we spoke about a woman who has everything perfectly arranged. In her finances, her car, wardrobe, future plans. As a result I can say I have virtually nothing in common with her. The entire filming was wonderful, and it was a great crowd of people in the summer in Třeboň.

The story’s main heroine finds herself in a situation in which, on the basis of her promise, is to remain with her husband “for better or for worse”, and therefore also to forgive. Do you believe in forgiveness, and if you yourself had to define the limit beyond which it’s no longer possible to forgive, what would it be?

It’s not possible to live without forgiveness. You cannot free yourself from a burden and go on with your life. I’m able to forgive, but not forget. And everyone has a different threshold. What some people can overlook, others can never get over. But cold, calculated cruelty, evil intention can never be forgiven. And also people have to be able to forgive themselves.

You’ve worked with the pairing of Hřebejk and Jarchovský for almost your entire acting career, Honeymoon is now the fourth time Jan has directed you. What are the advantages or disadvantages of this co-operation, when you know each other so well, on both a professional and personal level?

In short the advantage is the years we have behind us. But as in every long-term relationship, an advantage can quickly turn into a disadvantage. But the longer I know Jan, the more I admire him, and the same goes for Petr. I think we’re all joined together by the fact that for us it’s a genuine pleasure to go to work.

Was there any characteristic or element of the main character you contributed to either after reading the script or on location, something you either added or took away?

It’s funny, but I thought up the possibility that Tereza could be pregnant. It seemed to me that emotional hysteria and vigilance brought on by pregnancy could be the antithesis of her perfection. The sense of being in danger and exaggeration of everything. And the subsequent paranoia, when a woman sees hormones behind her every judgement. I think that in her case it’s clear that at that moment she is incapable of resolving something so unpleasant rationally. She wants it to just disappear, just go away. For the world to be once again as uncomplicated as she had built it. And now I’m bringing this idea to fruition… An exacting method of acting!

Jiří Černý – actor

After the film Garbage, the City and Death, Honeymoon is the second time you’ve worked with Jan Hřebejk, but the first time on an original film project. How was he to work with, what suits you about his approach, and are there any examples of moments which don’t suit you?

I enjoyed the preparations, we rehearsed, which today is unfortunately no longer the standard. Jan’s sense of humour suits me, though at certain moments it doesn’t suit me.

Through the medium of its characters, the film asks the audience the question of whether a person should bear responsibility and thus also be punished for something committed in the past. How would you respond to this question?

Punishment is just and inevitable. The worst punishment is a guilty conscience.

The main characters of the film resolve within themselves the question of whether it is possible to forgive someone close to them for their offence, and to stay with them “for better or for worse”. Do you believe in the need for forgiveness and is there a limit beyond which it is no longer possible to forgive?

I think everyone has to forgive themselves.

Jan Benda is a highly ambiguous character – on the one hand a victim, on the other, when he unexpectedly gains the opportunity for revenge, he doesn’t hesitate to take it, even at the price of using a person who hasn’t committed anything, namely Tereza, for this purpose. How did you view this character?

He also could have done nothing. In our case, however, he didn’t have the time to consider the legitimacy of his actions, let alone the potential consequences. In addition, who is Jan Benda?

Was any element of the character or any situation created on your initiative or following mutual discussions with the director or your colleagues?

I was most helped by Jan Hřebejk’s humour.

Viktor Tauš – producer

How did your co-operation with the pairing of Hřebejk+Jarchovský on Honeymoon come about?

I was asked to produce the film by Petr Jarchovský during the preparations for our film Clowns. In terms of energy it wasn’t the ideal moment… But I love the films of Jan Hřebejk and Petr Jarchovský, and I just couldn’t say no to the script of Honeymoon. However, it’s necessary to say that we were incredibly lucky, since Czech Television supported us. Without their help it wouldn’t have been possible to record the film within the given time.

What interested you as a producer in the script of Honeymoon, and why did you decide to produce the film?

I think Honeymoon is Petr’s best screenplay since “Divided We Fall”. It’s exceptional for its compactness of space and time within the joint work of Hřebejk and Jarchovský. I looked forward to seeing how Jan could construct a feature length film on the basis of two days of a wedding celebration.

What do you consider the film’s greatest strength?

The superb acting performances and also the striking, very elegant visuality of the film.

Cast

Tereza – Aňa Geislerová

Radim – Stanislav Majer

Benda – Jiří Černý

Renata – Kristýna Fuitová

Milan – David Máj

Karel – Jiří Šesták

Marie – Jana Radojčičová

Dominik –Matěj Zikán

Stanislav – Vlastimil Dušek

Ivana – Eva Kukučková

Photo

Photographer - Jiří Hanzl

Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
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Behind the Scene

Photographer - Jiří Hanzl

Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
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Moodboard

Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
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Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
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Sketches

Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
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Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
Honeymoon by Jan Kadlec
  • Credits
  • Photo
  • Behind the Scene
  • Moodboard
  • Sketches
  • About
  • Synopsis
  • Interviews
  • Cast